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Posted 1 year ago

earth-song:

Ruff (L: Philomachus pugnax / N: Brushane ), photo taken in the Varanger Peninsula - Northern Norway.

 

The combatant (Philomachus pugnax) is a species of bird of the family Scolopacidae limicola.

Unlike the other members of his family, has a very marked sexual dimorphism. The male measures about 28 cm in length, whereas the female is only 22 cm.

It nests in several countries in central Europe and winters mainly in Africa, but some individuals spend the winter in Europe. Attended mostly flooded areas such as ponds, arrozias and wetter terrain.

In Portugal it is more common in migratory passage, but is also observed in the winter months.

Posted 1 year ago
But luxury has never appealed to me, I like simple things, books, being alone, or with somebody who understands.
Daphne du Maurier (via larmoyante)
Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago
n-iggaaa:

fr3sh-c4ndy:

omg this is the coolest thing I have ever seen, I want this sooooo bad omg :o

BE MINE! o;

n-iggaaa:

fr3sh-c4ndy:

omg this is the coolest thing I have ever seen, I want this sooooo bad omg :o

BE MINE! o;

(Source: cineraria)

Posted 1 year ago
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joshbyard:

Progress in Using “Temporary Tattoos” Instead of Implants for Brain-Computer Interfaces

In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons. But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. 
Instead, electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use. 
His team is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity. “We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun,” Coleman says. 
The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.
The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.
Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

APPLY DIRECTLY TO THE FOREHEAD!
(via Temporary Tattoos Could Make Electronic Telepathy, Telekinesis Possible - Business Insider)

joshbyard:

Progress in Using “Temporary Tattoos” Instead of Implants for Brain-Computer Interfaces

In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons. But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them.

Instead, electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

His team is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity. “We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun,” Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

APPLY DIRECTLY TO THE FOREHEAD!

(via Temporary Tattoos Could Make Electronic Telepathy, Telekinesis Possible - Business Insider)

Posted 1 year ago

nationalpost:

Mona Lisa MkI: Mysterious early version of Da Vinci’s most famous portrait has art experts baffled
GENEVA — The mystery behind the most enigmatic smile in art — Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” — just got a little more complicated.

In a coming-out party of sorts in Geneva, rounds of flashbulbs popped Thursday as the non-profit Mona Lisa Foundation pulled back the curtain to present what it claims is a predecessor of the world’s most famous portrait. (Laurent Gillieron / Keystone / The Associated Press / Files)

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago